To Judge And Be Judged

“In order to get rid of your slippers, you have to admit they are yours, and if you do, then they will get rid of themselves…The key to your happiness is to own your slippers, own who you are, own your family, own the talents you have, and own the ones you don’t. If you keep saying your slippers aren’t yours, then you’ll die searching, you’ll die bitter, always feeling you were promised more. Not only our actions, but also our omissions, become our destiny.”  -Abraham Verghese

This quote rather intrigued me because I don’t know of many people who can completely “own” who they are. I find that there are far more people who would rather judge instead of reflecting their own energy inwards. Everybody can be judged for something they did, but if we spend all our energy focusing on that, then we’ll waste all our time. I found myself from time to time dividing the world into good and bad, right and wrong, and I thought by doing this, I would steer myself in a direction away from the bad and wrong. But I find now that I just placed myself into the judging category, when in fact it was not my job to do so. It was almost a fear, and being afraid to just love who I am, and own that I am who I am, and it doesn’t matter who I come in contact with. When I judge others, I am also judging myself. Judging limits us and hold us back. You need to set yourself free, and others as well. You have to learn to look inward and be in love with yourself, where you are right now, where you have already been, and who you are. Own your slipper, and embrace the inner beauty of your inner self.



Judgement. . .

As I sat in the pew of the overly packed church this afternoon, awaiting my ashes, I began to think about Lent and the weeks ahead. Thinking of being washed of my sins of the past, as she placed the ashes on my forehead, and as I took my first step away from her, thinking of how to embark on a better future with fewer mistakes. I thought of what I wanted to “give up” for Lent, and through the years it has always been the same, “don’t bite my nails.” But as I wiped the dust ashes from my eyes, I thought about the idea of judgement. Just yesterday, minding my own business, just enjoying the day, someone randomly decided to impose their opinion on my life, asking where my drive was? As I stared blankly back at them, I felt no response was necessary. I knew within myself, that I had more drive and strength then anyone could  or would ever need to see. For me, that’s enough. I began to think of the judgments I may at times impose on others, and thought that this Lent I will try my hardest just to be more understanding, and less judging. Because who am I really to judge another? I don’t know what they deal with on a daily basis, or what weight is on their shoulders. I only know what I carry, and to be an added burden to someone, just seems so unfair. So this Ash Wednesday I commit to hopefully being judgement free, and instead of being a burden, I hope to lighten your weight, even just a little. Everyone deserves to smile, and everyone deserves to do things in their own time, without judgement. Everyone deserves the opportunity to finding a better self.3f53528d6443507fa7415c8ec47d04d4